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institute, were not capable of doing that. that's a historic reality. in the 1990s when bill clinton said there's an election based on that, it was the house and senate that legislative sanctions on iran, the push for, like it or not, freedom for the iraqi people to push for sanctions on cuba, to push her more engagement and exactly which are talking about, that really pushed for in a relationship with india. i could go on and on. nato expansion. all the things taken for granted but not in initiative. they're members of congress on capitol hill who change the world in a very meaningful way and that's still an opportunity if we recognize we need to care about. sorry for that little speech. >> how do we know kind of the counterterrorism, is very much her? [inaudible] >> the question is how do we know when we've won? >> were in no danger of women anytime soon. this has become a sugarless because it's a fair question obviously. what you measure for success and how do we know when we stopped, and that we are so far away from that now a more further away than when this president took office in
clinton, john mccain, joe biden were falling all over themselves to express their support for israel. the only exception to that rule was senator chuck hagel. i don't have anything to go with that with what you might have said but -- some of the concerns -- i used to say when i was the whip in the house you can count on the house and the senate to be among other thing, always pro-israel. i think that is the main stream of our views. i've seen a number of times that you've said you can be pro-israel but that does not mean you have to be for everything that israel is for. they are what they are. they are reported from comments that you made that are out of the context of the other comments. also, earlier today, i asked you about the bloated pentagon. you said that -- those comments were before the sequestration bill passed. they were after the bill passed. sequestration passed on august 2 and the interview was on august 29. what you said on august 29 of -- in that "financial times" interview you said "the defense department, i think -- this is your quote "the defense department is blo
and the quote. a couple of points. let's go back to the ilsa vote. about the original vote during the clinton administration. and connect that to a comment i made in the world herald about they don't work. they are ineffective. and by the way, i've already noted for the record here that i have supported and voted for some unilateral sanctions. i think i noted three specific ones that i recall. but on your specific questions about the specific comment. just to give you an example of what i was talking about. you were not in the senate at the time. some were. but those who were here in the senate might recall the european union's reaction to that ilsa act. i was not in the senate when that was voted on original, so i didn't have a vote. but in 1988 the european union passed a resolution against the united states and threatened to take the united states to the world trade organization. as a consequence, secretary all bright had to get into this and as a consequence to that president clinton had to sign a waiver to allow a french oil company not to be part of that u.s. unilateral waiver. now, i'm
following today's session in the house at 11:00 a.m. eastern this morning. secretary of state clinton officially steps down today. john kerry will be sworn in today. was confirmed by the senate and will be sworn in by justice sotomayor. live coverage starting at 2:30 eastern. remarks atclinton's an event yesterday at the council on foreign relations where she talked about the need for smart power diplomacy. afterwards she to questions about the future of the american political system. this is about an hour. >> please take your seats. good afternoon. on behalf of our members, i want to welcome to the council on foreign relations. i'm president of the cfr. we're an independent membership organization, a think tank, and the publisher dedicated to the foreign policy choices facing this country. we are continuing secretary of state week at the council. we were fortunate to hear from george shultz on tuesday night who was secretary of state for some six and half years under ronald reagan. we're honored to host hilary rodham clinton during the last 24 hours as president obama's first secreta
of the family medical leave act signed into law in 1993 by president clinton. all these programs beginning at 8:00 eastern on the c-span networks. >> julia loved her time in the white house. she said in her memoirs, it was like a bright and beautiful dream. quite the most wonderful time of my life. so i think that gives you some idea of how much she enjoyed being first lady and how she felt her husband had finally achieved the recognition he deserved. >> historian eedth mayo on julia grant, who married her brother's west point roommate, ulysses s. grant. "first ladies: influence and image," their interests and influence on the president, produced with the white house historical association, it begins at february 18, 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. >> the single thing that coolidge did that we want to remember is when he left office the budget was lower than when he came in. that's the story for us now in a period where we're concerned. well, how did he do that? the economy grew a lot. maybe more than 3% sometimes. unemployment was below 5%. the budget was b
to now, mr. speaker, insert my -- that involve the former secretary of state, mrs. clinton, during a recent senate hearing. a senator who was examining secretary clinton suggested or implied that the administration may have misstated the nature of the benghazi attack which mrs. clinton responded, what difference at this point does it make? i submit, mr. speaker, that the survivors of the four americans who were murdered at that attack would welcome any information, any and all information surrounding that infamous invasion. the survivors are grieving, and any information that could illuminate in any way this tragic -- the tragedy that occurred in benghazi would welcome any and all information, it seems to me. yes, secretary clinton, at this pount it may well make a difference -- point it make well make a difference. i yield back, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. mcgovern, for five minutes. mr. mcgovern: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for five minutes and
to express our gratitude to outgoing secretary hillary rodham clinton -- [applause] for her tireless efforts to promote u.s. national interests overseas, to strengthen the department state, to promote and raise the profile of diplomacy and development as critical tools of our national statecraft. followe all together your leadership, we look forward to continuing this effort. thank you so much. [applause] >> it is my great honor and privilege to introduce someone who is -- who passionately cares about this institution, about the men and women who are geared not only because you are the son of a diplomat and not only because you have been the chairman of the foreign relations committee and not only because you have traveled the world on our behalf but because you care passionately about what we do and the vision in which we attempt to try to show the rest of the world. on behalf of the men and women, not only in this room but all over the world who are watching, only because you have traveled let me introduce to you the 68 secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> thank you very much. wow
president clinton who said the assault weapons ban was singularly ineffective. second slide. the department of justice, likewise, concluded the assault weapons ban "under it, there has been no discernible reduction in the lethality and injuriousness of gun violence." so the reaction of this tragedy in newtown is, for a lot of the elected officials, to rush to reenact a law that according to the department of justice did absolutely nothing to reduce gun violence. now, why is that? that is not accidental. the assault weapons ban, if it does not ban machine guns, what does it ban? what it does ban, i would suggest, are scary-looking guns. this is a photograph of a remington 750, one of the most popular hunting rifles in america. this rifle would be entirely legal under this so-called assault weapons ban. i have a question for you, mr. lapierre. functionally, in terms of the operations of this fire arm, semi-automatic, you pull the trigger, one bullet comes out. is the firing mechanism in this fire arm materially different from the so-called assault weapons ban that this bill is targeted at? >>
. it makes all the difference in the world. we've been having celebrations because both president clinton signed the family medical leave act shortly after his inauguration, so did -- so too did president obama sign the lilly ledbetter legislation, right as the first bill that he sign, focus on families in the workplace and how they are affected. last week under the leadership of the national partnership, we had a tremendous george miller was the hero there because he had been a leader in passing. the babies were adorable as they are here today. and so i thank you, deborah, last night deborah and judy, judy, the national treasurer, and that was 20 years ago, imagine now her value. [laughter] hosted a celebration from the senate side and here we are now. they will go to the labor department for further acknowledgment of how important this is. and why do we make such a fuss? well, vivian and matari told us why. but i want to also acknowledge the mothers who are here. wendy and her son julian. [applause] there. vickie and her son jasper. there. hey, jasper. give a wave. give a wave, jasper.
parties. you know mr. president, and the bill clinton's days, the balance the budget, we had economic growth. the past a lot of some of the legislation. we were bipartisan -- e passed a e passed a lot of legislation. we were bipartisan. one initiative saved the moap in utah. it transferred funds to native americans, cleaned up huge nuclear waste. there was also a bill in the department of energy. we resolved the problem. there was a senator from tennessee, fred thompson, who passed that bill. and there was a senator from utah that past that environmental bill. what we need to do is be bipartisan and it can be done. we have to bring the business community. we need to have job creation. >> i do not want to interrupt you, but i'm going to. i know for certain that i have republican colleagues who do not believe the sequester is a good idea. they think it is irresponsible. and we agree with them. so what is it we can put on the table. i am about as left of center as they get. i understand this is about making a deal. we have some say the major drivers are things like thingsbu but the fact
at the end of the democratic convention, after the speech by bill clinton. these chefs do change minds and i think fat they are one of the best parts of the campaign process and i think that we need to have more debates. >> but let me say to the scholars, they overlook the obvious and maybe that is why they are scholars. [laughter] no, that is applied -- that is not a put down. scholars need to go beyond the obvious. that is what makes them scholars. what is obvious is that 64 million people watched the first debate. four years ago was about the same number and there was no two-one change like there was in 2012 of what the debates too, they are confirming exercises. and the scholars tend to say, they did not change any votes and as a consequence the debates did not matter. people watch those debates, all the democrats and republicans watch, and if you are a republican you are watching your candidate in your already leaning that way. i liked this guy, and i am taking the measure, and there is a small percentage of people who are legitimately undecided. but the debate is for everyone. and what
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)